Report from 1943 NCSNA convention

REPORTS

 

41st ANNUAL MEETING  NORTH CAROLINA STATE NURSES’ ASSOCIATION 

WINSTON-SALEM, NORTH CAROLINA  OCTOBER 22, 23, 1943

 TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                         

Report of Headquarters Office

1

Report of N.C. Nursing Council for War Service

3

Report of N.C. Board of Nurses Examiners

6

Report of Educational Director

6

Report of Standardization Board

7

Report of Treasurer

7

Report of the Committee on Credentials

8

Report of Committee on Nominations

8

Report of Committee on Printing

8

Report of Committee on Legislation

9

Report of the Committee on Education

10

Report of Relief Fund

10

Report of the Committee on Revisions

10

Report of the Committee on Program

11

Report of Committee on Nursing Information Bureau

11

Report of the Mary Lewis Wyche Loan Fund

12

Report of Committee on Finance, Mary Lewis Wyche Loan Fund

12

Report of Committee on Membership

12

Report of State Committee on Registries

12

Report of Committee on Community Nursing Service

13

Report of the Committee on “AMERICAN JOURNAL OF NURSING”

14

Report of Committee on Sale of Histories

14

Report of N.C. League of Nursing Education

14

Report of Private Duty Section, N.C. State Nurses’ Association

15

Report of Public Health Section, N.C. State Nurses’ Association

16

Report of Office and Industrial Section, N.C. State Nurses’ Association

16

Report of District Number 1-Asheville

17

Report of District Number 2-Winston-Salem

17

Report of District Number 3-Charlotte

18

Report of District Number 4-Greensboro

19

Report of District Number 5-Durham

19

Report of District Number 6-Raleigh

20

Report of District Number 7-Fayetteville

21

Report of District Number 8-Wilson

22

Report of District Number 9-Wilmington

22

Reports of Nurses’ Clubs

23

Reports of Alumnae Associations

24

 

REPORT OF HEADQUARTERS’ OFFICE Of The NORTH CAROLINA STATE NURSES’ ASSOICATION

415 Commercial Bldg., Raleigh, N.C.

 October 1, 1942 – September 30, 1943

 Membership, total---2652

Membership, districts

                No. 1     270                         No. 4     295                         No. 7     194

                No. 2     339                         No. 5     246                         No. 8     310        

                No. 3     515                         No. 6     248                         No. 9     235

 

Letters written----------------------------------------------------------------------2285

Cards written-------------------------------------------------------------------------158

Packages------------------------------------------------------------------------------195

Membership transfers----------------------------------------------------- -------29

                (from one state association to another state association)

Membership transfers-----------------------------------------------------------...---33

                (from one district association to another district association)

Histories sold-----------------------------------------------------------------------20

Conferences-------------------------------------------------------------------------37

 

Field Work:

                All district nurses’ associations have been visited one or more times.

Meetings Attended by Executive Secretary:

National

Conference of Special Agents, United States Public Health Service, Bethesda, Maryland, November 13, 1942

Board of Directors, Southern Division of ANA, Memphis, Tennessee, April 17, 1943.

Advisory Council, American Nurses’ Association, Chicago, Illinois, June 14, 1943.

National League of Nursing Education, Chicago, Illinois, June 15-16, 1943.

Conference of Executive Secretaries, State Nursing Councils for War Service, Chicago, Illinois, June 17-18, 1943.

Institute for Executive Secretaries of State Nurses’ Associations, Chicago, Illinois, June 18-19-20, 1943.

Conference of Chairmen of State Nursing Committees for Procurement and Assignment Service, Chicago, Illinois, September 9-10, 1943.

State

40th annual convention of the North Carolina State Nurses’ Association and 24th annual meeting of the North Carolina League of Nursing Education, Raleigh, October 28-30, 1942.

Private Duty Institute, Raleigh, October 26-27, 1942.

North Carolina Nursing Council for War Service, Raleigh, October 27, 1942; Greensboro, March 20, 1943; Raleigh, August 14, 1943.

Mid-year meetings of Advisory Council, Board of Directors and Private Duty Section of North Carolina State Nurses’ Association, Greensboro, March 19-20, 1943. 

North Carolina League of Nursing Education, Greensboro, March 20, 1943.

State conference, “Acceleration of Basic Curricula,” Winston-Salem, May 10-11, 1943.

State Committees

                Committee on Revisions, Raleigh, October 18, 1942; Raleigh, June 5, 1943, Raleigh, August 12, 1943

                Committee on Legislation, Greensboro, December 28, 1943

                Committee on Education, Raleigh, January 19, 1943.

                State Nursing Committee for Procurement and Assignment Service, Raleigh, September 18, 1943

Allied Groups

                State Legislative Council (Several meetings in Raleigh).

                Legislative Committee, North Carolina Hospital Association, Raleigh, January 6, 1943.

                Regional Representatives, Office of War Information, Raleigh; January 15, 1943

Public Hearing of Appropriations Committee, North Carolina Legislature, relative to increased appropriations for the mental institutions of North Carolina, Raleigh, January 23, 1943.

Executive Committee, North Carolina Tuberculosis Association, Raleigh, January 21, 1943; Raleigh, April 7, 1943

Institute, North Carolina Tuberculosis Association, Raleigh, June 2, 1943.

Monthly meetings of Board of Directors of the Wake County Red Cross Chapter and chapter Recruitment Committee.

Institute, North Carolina Federation of Women’s Clubs, Raleigh, September 16, 1943.

Miscellaneous Work:

1943 Survey of nurses (detailed report will be found in report of North Carolina Nursing Council for War Service.).

Proceedings of 40th Annual Convention, North Carolina State Nurses’ Association corrected and edited.

April issue, “Tar Heel Nurse,” prepared for publication.

Combination program and bulletin prepared for publication.

Assisted the Secretary, North Carolina Board of Nurse Examiners with State Board Examinations, Raleigh, August 24, 25, 26, 1943.

Prepared three articles on nursing for the “North Carolina Club Woman,” official publication, North Carolina Federation of Women’s Clubs.

Assisted representatives of North Carolina Federation of Women’s Clubs in formulating procedures and rules to govern the four scholarships offered to prospective student nurses.

Prepared article for Year Book, North Carolina Federation of Women’s Clubs.

Large amount of work done on the proposed revisions of By-Laws of the North Carolina State Nurses’ Association.

The Executive Secretary has served as the Executive Secretary of the North Carolina Nursing Council for War Service.

Prepared article on recruitment of graduate nurses for military service for the “News Letter,” North Carolina Tuberculosis Association.

Participated in program of Institute of Executive Secretaries of State Nurses’ Association, Chicago, and June 20, 1943.

Assisted in giving oral Merrit Examination as requested by Merrit System Supervisor, State of Pennsylvania.

Studied employment stabilization as it affects nurses and sent material relative to same to each district nursing council for war service.

Quantities of material sent to state and district officers and other members of the North Carolina State Nurses’ Association and North Carolina Nursing Council for War Service.

Studied Procurement and Assignment of nurses under the War Manpower Commission.

FINANCIAL REPORT OF HEADQUARTERS’ OFFICE

 

Details                                                                  Budget                                                 Used

Salary, Executive, Secretary                                    $1,800.00                                             $1,800.00

                Salary, Office Secretary                               800.00                                                  835.00

                Rent                                                          240.00                                                  192.00

                Travel Expense                                           300.00                                                  259.31

                Office Supplies and Postage                         240.00                                                  255.46            

                Telephone                                                    30.00                                                   65.96

                                                                                   

                              Total                                        $3,410.00                                          $3,407.73

EXTRA EXPEDITURES

Typewriter repair---------------------------$12.95

Film, “R.N. Serving All Mankind”---------35.00

 

Cost of April Issue, “Tar Heel Nurse”

                   Printing-------------------$96.50

                   Postage--------------------28.50

                       Total                      $125.00

Respectfully submitted, 

Mrs. Marie B. Noell, R.N.

Executive Secretary

  

NORTH CAROLINA NURSING COUNCIL FOR WAR SERVICE

                   Two meetings of the North Carolina Nursing Council for War Service have been held—Greensboro, March 20, and Raleigh, August 14, 1943.  On January 6, Miss Bertha Allwardt, Consultant, U.S. Public Health Service, conferred with several members of the Council.

1943 Survey of All Graduate Registered Nurses

                   Preparation for the 1943 re-survey of all graduate nurses was begun in November, 1942.  The Executive Secretary and Hazel Williams, First Vice-President, North Carolina State Nurses’ Association, attended the conferences of State Agents of the United States Public Health Service in Bethesda, Maryland, November 13, 1942, at which time the general plans for the 1943 survey were made.

                   A report of the conference was duly made to Miss Wakefield, Chairman of the North Carolina Nursing Council for War Service, and plans for the survey in North Carolina were made.  It was decided to conduct the survey on a state basis, using the lists of names secured by the county nurse deputies as mailing lists.  This was done.  Volunteer helpers were secured from the Wake County Volunteer Service to assist in addressing the postal-card questionnaires.  Extra office space and furniture were secured free. 

       A bulletin was sent to each district nurses’ association on December 7, 1942, explaining the procedure of the survey.

        Newspaper and radio publicity relative to the survey were secured for the week of December 15-22, 1942.

      The Board of Directors, North Carolina State Nurses’ Association approved any extra expenditure connected with the survey.

     On December 29 and 30, 1942, the addressed questionnaires were mailed per schedule.  Additional questionnaires were mailed upon request. 

       The questionnaires were returned daily.  They were tabulated at Headquarters’ Office as to area (county), activity, availability, position, age and marital status.  Progress reports were sent to the U.S. Public Health Service, Washington, D.C., the first and fifteenth of each month.  Final tabulations were sent to the U.S. Public Health Service, April 6 and were published in the April Issue of the “Tar Heel Nurse.”

                   Miss Maude Brown, State Nurse Deputy, assisted with the tabulations.  No extra clerical help was necessary.

                   After tabulations were completed, the return questionnaires were sent to county nurse deputies to be used as a county roster of nurses.  A state file of the returned questionnaires was not made.

                   Final tabulations are as follows:

                                                 Questionnaires mailed--------------------------------------5,845

                                                 Questionnaires returned and tabulated--------------------3,433

                                                 Nurses active in nursing work------------------------------2,542

                                                 Nurses inactive but available for nursing---------------------417

                                                 Nurses inactive and not available for nursing----------------474

 

                   The cost of the 1943 Survey to the North Carolina State Nurses’ Association was:

                                                 Moving office furniture-------------------------------$3.00

                                                 Typewriter repair-------------------------------------12.95

                                                 Scotch tape--------------------------------------------4.25

                                                 Scotch tape dispenser---------------------------------1.29

                                                 Rubber stamp ink------------------------------------     .22

                                                 Alternation of rubber stamps---------------------------2.90

                                                 Total                                                                  $24.61

 

                   Since all future surveys will be the responsibility of the War Manpower Commission, the appointment of your Executive Secretary as Special Agent of the U.S. Public Health Service was terminated on July 3, 1943.

 

Recruitment of Student Nurses

                   The chairman and executive secretary have worked constantly with the Committee on Recruitment of Student Nurses.  Bulletins from the National Nursing Council for War Service were studied carefully and suggestions were followed when applicable to this state.

                   Newspaper and radio publicity were secured on a state basis and local recruitment committees were assisted with publicity.

                   A film, “R.N. Serving All Mankind,” was purchased by the North Carolina State Nurses’ Association.  It was shown in many schools and colleges and high schools.

                   Many requests for information about enrolling in schools of nursing were received at Headquarters’ Office.  Each such request was answered by letter and accompanied by a copy of “Nursing and How to Prepare for It,” a list of accredited schools of nursing in North Carolina a copy of educational requirements.

 

Conference on Acceleration of Basic Curricula

                   The North Carolina Nursing Council for War Service sponsored a conference to discuss Acceleration of Basic Curricula in North Carolina.  The conference was held in Winston-Salem, May 10-11, 1943.  Miss E. Louise Grant, Special Consultant on Acceleration, National Nursing Council for War Service, spoke and led the discussion on acceleration. Miss Mary Dunn, Senior Consultant, U.S. Public Health Service, Washington, D.C., spoke on “Federal Aid for Nursing Education” and reviewed the Bolton Bill which was then pending.  Attendance was good, and the conference was declared a success.

 

Bolton Bill and U.S. Cadet Nurse Corps

                   For several months your chairman and executive secretary watched the progress of the Bolton/Bill which provides for the training of nurses for the armed forces, governmental and civilian hospitals, health agencies and war industries, through grants to institutions providing such training.  Letters urging support of the bill were written to all North Carolina Senators and Congressmen.  The Bill was passed in May and was signed by the President in June when it became an act.  Since then an appropriation of $45,000,000 for the training of nurses—students and graduates—has been made.  Plans for the U.S. Cadet Nurse Corps under the program are being worked out as rapidly as possible.  Many schools of nursing in North Carolina are participating in the program.

 

Employment Stabilization Act

                   By executive order of May 15, 1943, nursing as an essential service came under the Employment Stabilization Act.  Employment Stabilization as it is related to nursing has been studied carefully and material explaining its functions has been sent to all district councils.

 

Scholarships

                   Four scholarships of $250 each were offered by the North Carolina Federation of Women’s Clubs to four well qualified North Carolina girls who desired to enter schools of nursing in North Carolina.  The Educational Director and Executive Secretary assisted representatives of the Federation in formulating procedures and rules to govern the scholarships.  The four scholarships were awarded to students who were entering fall classes in North Carolina schools of nursing.  Two of these students enrolled in the U.S. Cadet Nurse Corps and did not need the scholarships.  Other scholarships given by individual clubs have been awarded.

 

Procurement and Assignment Services

For several months the National Nursing Council for War Service, through the Sub-Committee on Nursing had been trying to secure governmental assistance in the supply and distribution of nursing services.  Your chairman and executive secretary followed the progress of the formation of a nursing unit with much interest.

At the conference of representatives of state nursing councils for war service held in Chicago, June 17-18, 1943, it was announced that by Congressional action, a Nursing Division had been established in the Procurement and Assignment Service of the War Manpower Commission.  Plans for the establishment and functioning of Procurement and Assignment of Nurses one state and local level were discussed.

The Council was instructed to re-organize its State Committee on Supply and Distribution which would function as the State Nursing Committee for Procurement and Assignment Service.  This was done.  Mrs. Marie B. Noell, R.N., was appointed by Paul V. McNutt as Chairman.

Miss Wakefield and Mrs. Noell attended a conference of Chairmen of State Nursing Committees for Procurement and Assignment Service held in Chicago, September 9-10.  Directives and criteria were reviewed and discussed.

A meeting of the State Committee was held in Raleigh, September 18, at which time plans for establishing a state headquarters for the procurement and assignment of nurses were made.

General information on the Procurement and Assignment Service has been sent to chairmen of district nursing councils for war service and county nurse deputies.

 

Auxiliary Workers

Auxiliary workers are being used in many hospitals of the state.  Several hospitals have cooperated with local Red Cross Chapters in training Red Cross Nurse Aids.  Graduates of those courses have rendered much assistance to graduate nurses in hospitals purely on a volunteer basis.

Some hospitals employ auxiliary workers who have in some cases had part of their basic training in a nursing school. Some other hospitals have trained their own auxiliary workers.

In view of the fact that many women, Waves, and hospital corpsmen are being given courses in assisting nurses, and that following the war persons from all of these groups will have had a vast amount of experience in caring for the sick; the North Carolina Nursing Council for War Service voted on August 14 to recommend to the Committee on Legislation of the North Carolina State Nurses’ Association to give careful consideration to legal registration of auxiliary workers.

Financial Assistance

Extra expense caused by the work of the North Carolina Nursing Council for War Service has been paid by the North Carolina State Nurses’ Association.

The National Nursing Council, unable to assist state councils from a financial standpoint, suggested that each state council investigate the possibility of financial aid from the United War Fund of their state.  The North Carolina Nursing Council for War Service made application to the United War Fund of North Carolina for financial assistance.  The reply to the chairman’s letter revealed that the budget of the War Fund had been made, but that the request would be given consideration.  If the quota is oversubscribed, there is a possibility that some assistance can be given the Council. 

By-Laws

                The National Nursing Council for War Service suggested that state councils adopt simple by-laws.  The chairman appointed a committee to prepare some simple by-laws, using the guide furnished by the National Council and the by-laws of the North Carolina State Nurses’ Association as models.  This has been done.

 Lay Membership

                The importance of lay participation in the present crisis of nursing has been realized for some time.  On August 14, the Council voted to invite the North Carolina Federation of Women’s Clubs, North Carolina Board of Education, United War Fund of North Carolina, North Carolina Congress of Parents and Teachers and other organizations related to nursing to appoint representatives from each organization to serve as a member of the North Carolina Nursing Council for War Service.  This was done.  The following groups have appointed representatives: North Carolina Federation of Women’s Clubs, Mrs. Charles Doak, Raleigh; North Carolina Congress of Parents and Teachers, Mrs. Alice Futrell, Hertford; North Carolina Board of Education, Mrs. E.L. McKee, Sylva.

                Representatives of the North Carolina Medical Society, North Carolina Hospital Association, North Carolina State Board of Health and the State Emergency Medical Service of the Office of Civilian Defense have been members of the Council for some time. 

Red Cross Recruitment

                Early in 1943 the National Red Cross Nursing Service assumed the entire responsibility for recruiting nurses for the Army and Navy Nurse Corps.  They felt they needed the assistance of County Red Cross Chapters in this endeavor.  Therefore, the local Red Cross Recruitment Committees were re-organized and a new committee was established in every city of 25,000 populations or more that did not have a local committee.  There are now eight Red Cross Recruitment Committees in North Carolina: Asheville, Winston-Salem, Charlotte, Greensboro, Durham, Raleigh, Rocky Mount and Wilmington.

General Information

                The chairman and executive secretary have studied bulletins and material on the various works of nursing councils for war service very carefully.  Quantities of material has been forwarded to the chairmen of district nursing councils for war service, county nurse deputies and chairmen of the committees of the council 

Respectfully submitted,

 Mrs. Marie B. Noell, R.N.

Executive Secretary

 

REPORT OF THE NORTH CAROLINA BOARD OF NURSE EXAMINERS

September, 1942

                Enrolled for examinations----------415

                Reported for examination----------411

                Passed examinations---------------376

                Registered in recognition of their

                Registration in other states----------35

March, 1943

                Enrolled for examinations----------164

                Reported for examination----------162

                Passed examinations---------------140

                Registered in recognition of their

                Registration in other states----------38

August, 1943

                Enrolled for examinations----------478

                Reported for examination----------475

 

                We wish to report that simplified application forms have been filed in a number of instances by nurses who came to the state with husbands in the armed forces and wished to register.  Our hospitals and patients have had the advantage of the services of these nurses, many of whom probably would not have filed applications if the simplified form had not been available.  To date fees have been returned to six nurses who have moved before the six-month period was over.

                The checking account of the Board was $7,211.39 as of September 

Josephine Kerr, R.N.

                                                                                                                                                      President

 

REPORT OF EDUCATIONAL DIRECTOR

                The educational director spent two weeks this summer at Teachers College, New York, where the accelerated program in nursing schools was discussed.  It was brought out there that an accelerated program could be made a very good one by careful planning.  It will be more expensive for the hospital, as the student must get at least as much formal instruction in thirty months as she heretofore been getting in thirty-six months and is necessarily on the ward a few hours less each week.  The Federal Congress recognized that this was true and that, together with the urgent need for more nurses, was the reason for the $45,000,000 appropriation for nursing education made by the 78th Congress.

                The great amount of correspondence that has come to the office has kept the office secretary and educational director very busy throughout the summer months.  During the six weeks following July 1, they sent out 2,087 pieces of mail, including 1,070 questionnaires to prospective nursing students.  The number of phone calls and conferences since the passage of the Bolton Bill has greatly increased.  Nearly all of the inquiries are regarding the U.S. Cadet Nurse Corps.  I believe that the schools that are approved for participation in the Federal training program will keep our office informed as to the time of admission of classes and their need for students.  We can refer to them a sufficient number of young women to fill their classes.

 

Respectfully submitted, 

Bessie M. Chapman, R.N.

Educational Director 

REPORT OF STANDARDIZATION BOARD

            The 1943 Circular of Information which contains valuable information for guidance of schools of nursing is soon to be released form the press.  Booklets will be sent to all schools of nursing and to others who request a copy.

                All schools of nursing have been notified as to their rating—Group 1 or II.  Letters sent to your secretary have shown that this information has been received with interest and appreciation.

                The Rules of Procedure for the guidance of Standardization Board meetings have been filed with the Secretary of State, Mr. Thad M. Eure.

                It has been decided by the Standardization Board that during the emergency, applicants may be admitted to schools of nursing at the age of seventeen years and six months.  They may take State Board Examinations at the end of thirty-six months but may not be issued a certificate until they have attained the age of twenty-one years.

                At the request of the Federal Government, the Standardization Board is encouraging the North Carolina schools of nursing to cooperate with the U.S. Cadet Nurse Corps plan in order that nurses may be available for service under graduate supervision in governmental hospitals or other civilian hospitals at the end of thirty months’ training.

                The members of the Standardization Board also feel that it would be a desirable arrangement for some method to be worked out whereby partial credit for previous college training could be granted to students on their course in nursing.

                The Standardization Board has personnel with representation from the North Carolina Hospital Association, North Carolina Board of Nurse Examiners and North Carolina State Nurses’ Association.  The president of the North Carolina State Nurses’ Association is an ex-officio member.

                The members of the Standardization Board are: Dr. George L. Carrington, Chairman, Mrs. Z.V. Conyers, Secretary; Dr. H.L. Johnson, Mr. Sample B. Forbes, Dr. Moir S. Martin, Dr. W.I. Wooten, Dr. J.K. Pepper, Bessie Chapman, Josephine Kerr, Ruth Pennill, Ruth Council and Hazel Williams.

Respectfully submitted,   Mrs. Z.V. Conyers, R.N.   Secretary

REPORT OF TREASURER

 

Balance – October 1, 1942

          Checking Account-------------$3,672.10

          Savings Account-----------------1,782.42

Total---------------------------------------------------------------------------$8,932.52

Receipts – October 1, 1942 – September 30, 1943------------------------9,402.90

Total Receipts and Balance------------------------------------------------$18,335.42

Disbursements, October 1, 1942 – September 30, 1943------- ----------9,167.02

Balance, September 30, 1943----------------------------------------------$9,168.40

          Composed of:

                     Checking Account------ $3,907.98

                    Savings Account--------- 1,782.42

                     U.S. War Bonds---------- 3,478.00

Total Balance-------------------------------------------------------------------$9,168.40

 Respectfully submitted,    Mrs. EliTreasurer

 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON CREDENTIALS

                The Committee on Credentials wishes to report that so far as the members know, the district boundaries are satisfactory to the members of the districts.  No request for the formation of a new district has come to our attention.

Respectfully submitted, Elizabeth Moore, R.N.  Chairman

REPORT OF THE COMMTTEE ON NOMINATIONS

 

President                                       Flora Wakefield, R.N.                     Raleigh

First Vice-President                        Hazel Williams, R.N.                       Raleigh

Second Vice-President                    Mrs. Ludlow Rogers, R.N.                Durham

Secretary                                       Alna Kermon, R.N.                         Raleigh

Treasurer                                        Mrs. Elizabeth Clement, R.N.          Greensboro

Directors:                                       Monttose Austin, R.N.                    Charlotte

                                                      Esta Kirk, R.N.                              Asheville

Board of Nurse Examiners                 Bessie M. Chapman, R.N.               Raleigh

Committee on Nominations:             Mrs. Emily Pickard, R.N.                   Durham

                                                      Mrs. L.C. Gurley, R.N.                     Rocky Mount

                                                       Mrs. Bessie Powell Neely, R.N.         Wilmington

Respectfully submitted, 

Montrose Austin, R.N.

                                                                                                                                                      Chairman

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON PRINTING

For Annual Meeting

                Mitchell Printing Company, Raleigh---------Slides for badges

                Mitchell Printing Company, Raleigh---------Combination Program and Bulletin

                Mitchell Printing Company, Raleigh---------Ballots for Public Health Section  N.C. State Nurses’ Assoc

For “Tar Heel Nurse”

                Mitchell Printing Company, Raleigh--------------3,000 copies, “Tar Heel Nurses,”

                                Official Bulletin, N.C. State Nurses’ Association (April issue)

Headquarters’ Office

                Mitchell Printing Company, Raleigh

                                4,000 letterheads, 8 ½ * 11

                                2,000 letterheads, 8 ½ * 7

                                2,000 #6  ¾ letterheads

                                2,000 #10 envelopes

                                3,000 notices of transfers (state to state)

                                1,000 sets transfer forms in triplicate

                                3,000 ANA membership cards

 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mrs. Marie B. Noell, R.N.

                                                                                                                                                           Chairman

 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON LEGISLATION

                Your Legislative chairman and the president of the North Carolina Board of Nurse Examiners, Miss Josephine Kerr, attended the New York Conference of Members of Boards of Nurse Examiners and the meeting for Executive Secretaries and Legislative Chairmen in December, 1942.

                At that time we were given information regarding a proposal which was being sent to the governors of all states recommending that the Legislatures give certain emergency powers to the governors of the State Defense Council.  These powers included among many others the following:

“Recognizing the existence of such emergency, the Legislature deems it wise, for the protection of the health and welfare of the people of the State to give to (the Governor) (State Defense Council) the power to provide for the temporary admission to practice in the State of physicians, dentist and registered nurses licensed as such outside the State upon conditions under regulations prescribed by them notwithstanding the provisions of law governing the examination, certification and licensing of out of State practionners.”

                On my return to Raleigh, the advice of our attorney was sought regarding this.  He advised us to oppose any such proposal.  A meeting of your Legislative Committee was called, and it was recommended that the proposal be opposed.  The committee had also studied the advisability of asking the Legislature to reduce the reciprocity fee from $25 to $10 and asking for annual re-registration for all nurses.  We questioned the advisability of presenting legislation but thought the reduction in the fee charged would make for better feeling among those who came from other states.  We do feel that the advantages of re-registration to the individual nurses and to the Association would make it sufficiently worthwhile to the nurses that they would be willing to pay a $1 re-registration fee.  Your president wrote all the directors, and their unanimous opinion was that the proposal to register, regardless of qualifications, all nurses who had ever been registered, be opposed.  The majority favored the other proposal.  We then discussed this with our attorney again who advised against asking for re-registration at this time giving as his reason that this is likely to be a short session, and only essential legislation is likely to be considered.

                After our committee meetings, Dr. Haywood, Legislative Chairman for the Medical Society, and I had a conference with the Governor.  He assured us that he was opposed to granting registration to doctors and nurses except through the regular Boards.

                The North Carolina State Nurses’ Association is a member organization of the Legislative Council which is composed of organizations interested in social and health legislation.  This organization employed an executive secretary who attended legislative sessions and helped to watch for legislation that would affect nurses adversely.

                Mrs. Noell, your Executive Secretary, and some of the officers of the North Carolina State Nurses’ Association attended hearings of some of the committees for bills that would make for better social conditions.

                At the meeting of the Association last fall it was voted to subscribe to the Legislative Bulletin of the Institute of Government.  The North Carolina Board of Nurse Examiners agreed to pay one half of this cost.

                The Legislature has adjourned, and no legislation inimical to the interests of nurses was passed.

                Your Legislative Committee has noted the increased interest throughout the nation in the registration of auxiliary workers (nursing aids).  It recommends that a committee be appointed to make a study in cooperation with other interested groups which would include representatives from the Medical Society, the Hospital Association and the general public preparatory to asking for legislation on this question.               

Respectfully submitte
Bessie M. Chapman, R.N., Chairman
Margaret Pinkerton, R.N
Hazel Williams,
Mrs. E. Irby Long, R.N.
Mary Belle May, R.N.
Edna L. Heinzerling, RN 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION

                The members of the Education Committee carried on extensive correspondence with the different centers of Nursing Education in trying to secure an instructor for the Nursing Education course at the University for the 1943 Summer Session.

                We regret that we were unable to find one and had to give up the idea of offering the course at that time. 

                We recommend that the State Association sponsor a nursing education course next summer at the University.

Respectfully submitted

Jessie McLeam, R.N.

Chairman

REPORT OF RELEIF FUND

September 30, 1942 – September 30, 1943

Receipts

               Balance on hand, September 30, 1942----------------$733.91

               Dues, N.C.S.N.A. 1942-------------------------------------93.00

               Dues, N.C.S.N.A. 1943----------------------------------1292.50

Total-----------------------------------------------------------------$2119.41

Disbursements

               10 Beneficiaries $10 per month for 12 months---------$1200.00

               Audit, 1942----------------------------------------------------15.00

               Stamps and envelopes------------------------------------------4.00

               Check Books-----------------------------------------------------1.00

               Bank tax-----------------------------------------------------       .68

Total---------------------------------------------------------------------$1220.68

Balance in checking account----------------------------------------------898.73

 

               Ten beneficiaries are as follows:

                    District #1 – Asheville—2                                          District #5 – Durham ----1

                    District #2 – Winston-Salem --- 0                              District #6 – Raleigh -- 1

                    District #3 – Charlotte --- 0                                       District #7 – Fayetteville --- 1

                   District #4 – Greensboro – 0                                        District #8 – Wilson --- 1

                   District #9 – Wilmington --- 4

Respectfully submitted,  Jessie McLeam, R.N.                  

 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON REVISIONS

 

                The Committee on Revisions of the North Carolina State Nurses’ Association met August 12, 1943, at Headquarters’ Office, Raleigh, North Carolina, for the purpose of reviewing the proposed revisions of the by-laws after the Committee on Constitution and By-Laws, American Nurses’ Association, had suggested the necessary changes.

                The proposed changes were carefully reviewed, and it was the hope of this committee to present these changes to the districts for approval before October, 1943. This could not be accomplished.

                It has been suggested that we allow the by-laws to remain as they stand for the present.  It is to be expected that the war may change the whole situation and that the by-laws would have to be re-written in a short time.

 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edna L. Heinzerling, R.N., Chairman

                                                                                                                                      Josephine Kerr, R.N.

                                                                                                                                          Ellen Bruton, R.N.

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON PROGRAM

 

                The Committee on Program is composed of the Executive Secretary and chairman of the sections of the North Carolina State Nurses’ Association and the President of the North Carolina League of Nursing Education.

                Because of the action taken at the 1942 Annual Convention relative to omitting conventions for the duration, a full program for the 1943 Business Meeting was not planned.  Therefore, no meetings of the committee have been held.  Necessary arrangements have been made by correspondence.

 

Respectfully submitty 

   Mrs. Marie B. Noell, R.N.  

 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON NURSING INFORMATION BUREAU

                The aim of the Committee on Nursing Information has been to inform the general public about this nursing profession.

                Never in this history of nursing has so much creditable publicity been given to the needs of the profession.  Quantities of information have been sent to the general public through the radio and press----national, state, and local.

                Nursing leaders have given their time in directing the attention of eligible young women to accredited schools of nursing, Red Cross enrollment and various other needs of the profession.  Through the untiring efforts of these leaders, great accomplishments have been made in the past year.

Projects

                To recruit student nurses:

  1. Provide speakers and films for college and high school students
  2. Radio and press publicity
  3. Guidance and further information for prospective student nurses

To influence the retired nurse to become active for the duration:

  1. General publicity
  2. Through local nursing groups

 

Accomplishments:

                Quantities of literature containing much information about nursing have been widely distributed.

                The North Carolina Federation of Women’s Clubs has adopted a nursing program which includes:

  1. Offering scholarships to deserving young women who are interested in nursing.
  2. Publicizing the need for all inactive nurses to return to active duty for the duration.

 

The films “R.N. Serving All Mankind” and “No Greater Glory,” have been shown in the high schools of several counties.

Speakers have been sent too many colleges and high schools.

Much publicity has been given the establishment of the Cadet Nurse Corps, provided for by the Bolton Act.

 

Results:

                Enrollments in schools of nursing, especially those schools participating in the Federal program under the Bolton Act, have increased.

                Many inactive nurses have become active and are serving as staff and private duty nurses.

                The general public is showing greater interest in the problems of the nursing profession, and is cooperating with the profession in providing adequate nursing for the armed forces and civilians.

 

REPORT OF THE MARY LEWIS WYCHE LOAN FUND

 

Reported, October 1, 1942-----------------$984.08

Contribution, District #7----------------------20.00

Contribution, District #8----------------------25.00

Part of Loan Repaid--------------------------180.00

Sanatorium Alumnae Association--------------5.00

Interest-----------------------------------------14.00

                Total----------------------------$1228.2

Loan outstanding--------------$20.00

 

Respectfully submitted, 

Jessie McLean, R.N.

Chairman

 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON FINANCE, MARY LEWIS WYCHE LOAN FUND

 

In March, 1942, a loan of $200 secured by a note was made to a student taking a course in Public Health Nursing at the University of North Carolina.  The note called for regular month payments on the loan beginning January 1, 1943.

                Regular monthly payments of $20 have been made, beginning in January, and the note has been reduced until there is only one more payment to be made.

                The committee is willing to receive other applications for loans, but realizes that with the offer of Federal assistance under the Bolton Act, our fund will probably be more useful in the post war period, when Federal funds are not so likely to be available.

 

Respectfully submitted, 

Bessie M. Chapman, R.N., Chairman

 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON MEMBERSHIP

                The Committee on Membership is composed of the Executive Secretary of the North Carolina State Nurses’ Association and a respective from each of the nine district nurses’ associations.

                February is designated by ANA as membership month.  Letters were sent to chairmen of district membership committees urging district associations to emphasize membership at their February meetings.

                Following State Board Examinations, an invitation to join the North Carolina State Nurses’ Association was sent to each new registrant.

                Directors of nursing in hospitals throughout the state have been asked to urge all nurses employed in hospitals to become members of the North Carolina State Nurses; Association.

                All publications of the “Tar Heel Nurse,” the official bulletin of the North Carolina State Nurses’ Association, have carried an article designed to stimulate the interest of all members in increasing membership.

                District treasurers were asked to follow up members whose dues had lapsed and to encourage them to become re-instated. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mrs. Marie B. Noell., R.N.

Chairman

 

REPORT OF STATE COMMITTEE ON REGISTRIES

                There have been no meetings of the State Committee on Registries.  The work has been done by correspondence.

                This committee wishes to report that there are eight professional registries in the state.  They are located as follows: Asheville, Charlotte, Durham, Greensboro, Raleigh, Salisbury, Wilmington and Winston-Salem.  These registries report a total enrollment of 635 registrants: 123 less than last year.

                Each registry employs one registrar, with relief furnished as an assistant or relief help in some suitable manner.

                All registries in North Carolina are being conducted on a schedule acceptable to the respective districts and North Carolina State Nurses’ Association.  Records are kept and monthly reports are sent to state and national nursing headquarters. 

                The present emergency has increased the difficulties of registries.  Some registries are considering the inclusion of practical nurses in order to meet the demands.

                Registries have made every effort to contact available inactive nurses, to encourage eligible registrants to enroll in Red Cross War Reserve, have cooperated with local emergency medical services in civilian defense.

 

                The following chart is submitted for general information:

                                                Char.     Dur.       Ashe.    Salis.      Ral.         Green.  WIlm.    Winston-S.

 

Active registrants             172         92           84           25           99           96           104         86

October 1, 1942

 

Active registrants

October 1, 1943                173         58           70           18           70           72           103         71

 

Number paid dues                                                          48-6Mo.

For 1973                               198         107         72           61-12Mo.             72           100         110

 

Single nurses on

Registry                                                107         22           34           10           20           27           19           27

 

Nurses of military

Age                                        95           15           16           8              38           27           12           38          

 

Nurses with

Children                               66           17           12           6              23           28           21           13

 

Average of unfilled

Calls per month                                29           92           47           30           7              60           21           39

 

Nurses registered

Who have come back

To work during the

War emergency                                30           14           11           1              4              10           8              8             

 

Approximate number

Of nurses who could be

Recruited for active

Private duty or hospital

Work                                                     89           28                                           10                           17

 

Do any private duty

nurses Remain for

work in hospitals

after their working

hours?                                  No          Yes         Very      No          No          Few       No          Yes (to teach

                                                                                few                                                                                        nurse aids)

Respectfully submitted, 

Mary R. Gladstone, R.N.

Chairman

 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON COMMUNITY NURSING SERVICE

The Committee on Community Nursing Service met in Chapel Hill on June 25, 1943.  The report of the Joint Committee on Community Nursing Service, which was made at the business meeting of this National Nursing Organizations in Chicago, June 15-17, 1943, was read and discussed.  It was decided that it would be well for North Carolina to follow the action of the Joint Committee in which they agreed that any active program of the Committee on Community Nursing should rest in abeyance in order to avoid confusion with the program of the National Nursing Council for War Service, which has urged all states to create state nursing councils for war service.

                “The Joint Committee on Community Nursing Service will exercise extreme watchfulness in order to utilize for community nursing when the emergency is over the machinery now being set up for war service purposes.

                “It is hoped that functions of community nursing councils may from the beginning be kept in mind by these new nursing councils on war service”—quoted from the minutes of the Joint Committee Meeting held December 6, 1941.

 

Respefully submitted, 

Amy Louise Fisher, Chairman

Mrs. Emily Pickard, R.N.

Mrs. Glenn C. Cline, R.N. 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON “AMERICAN JOURNAL OF NURSING”

 

                This committee is composed of representatives from each of the nine district nurses’ association of the North Carolina State Nurses’ Association with the Executive Secretary as chairman.  No meetings have been held.

                Each district nurses’ association has a Journal “Committee, the objective of which is to teach the uses of the professional magazine and take subscriptions.

                An article about the use and benefits of the “American Journal of Nursing” appeared in the April issue of the “Tar Heel Nurse.”

                The latest reports from the office of the “American Journal of Nursing” show that subscriptions in North Carolina total 1,167.  This is an increase of 117 for the year.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Mrs. Marie B. Noell, R.N.

Executive Secretary

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON SALE OF HISTORIES

                “The History of Nursing in North Carolina,” by Mary Lewis Wyche, edited by Edna L. Heinzerling, was published by the University of North Carolina Press in 1938. 

                Every North Carolina nurse should own a copy of this book, and it should be in every nursing school library.  Copies are on sale at Headquarters’ Office, 415 Commercial Building, Raleigh, North Carolina.

                During the past year twenty copies have been sold.

Respectfully submitted, 

Mrs. Marie B. Noell, R.N.

Chairman

 

REPORT OF NORTH CAROLINA LEAGUE OF NURSING EDUCATION

Membership – 102 (Four of whom are sustaining members.)

                Eastern Division – 43

                Western Division – 48

                Out of State – 11

Number of Meetings Held – One

                The one state-wide meeting of the League was held at the O. Henry Hotel, Greensboro, North Carolina, March 19, 1943.  The program consisted of a talk by Josephine McLeod, Educational Director and Secretary of the Virginia Board of Nurse Examiners, Richmond, Virginia.  Miss McLeod reviewed the progress of accelerating the basic curricula in the Virginia schools of nursing, whose problems are somewhat similar to those of North Carolina.  A panel discussion followed.  Those participating in the discussion were: Mary Belle May, Ann Henshaw Gardiner, Ruth Council, Margaret Pinkerton, and Bessie M. Chapman.

Aims

                Increased membership

                Post graduate courses for the graduate nurse

                Responsibility for publicity programs

                Affiliations for students in small amounts

                League program in each district in May

                Recruitment of student nurses

                Supply and distribution of nurses

                Central schools of nursing as a definite part of modern nursing education

Achievements

                Membership increased

                Each of the nine district nurses’ associations sponsored a League program at their May      meetings.

                Two meetings of the Committee on Curriculum were held.  Purpose of the meetings was to discuss acceleration of the Basic Curricula.

                The North Carolina Joint Orthopedic Nursing Advisory Committee was organized.

                The objectives of this Committee are:

  1. To make a survey to determine personnel available for giving or supervising care.
  2. To promote staff education, integration in daily program.
  3. To sponsor educational programs on orthopedic nursing on a state and district basis.
  4. To consider the possibilities of student nurse affiliation in an orthopedic hospital.
  5. To consider the possibilities for an orthopedic nursing course in one of the state’s universities.

Work of Committee on Tests and Measurements

  1. Questionnaires were sent to the directors of all schools of nursing.
  2. Thirty questionnaires were returned which revealed that fifteen schools use pre-nursing and guidance tests.

 

Donations

                A donation of $10 was made to the Emergency Fund of the National League of Nursling Education.

 

Miscellaneous

                The President sent letters to all schools of nursing announce the appointment of Bessie M. Chapman as state advisor of the “Educational Program in War-Time.”

                The National League of Nursing Education voted at its Fiftieth Annual Convention held in Chicago, Illinois, June 15-17, 1943, to have lay members.

Respectfully submitted, 

Sadye Whitley, R.N.

President

 

REPORT OF PRIVATE DUTY SECTION, NORTH CAROLINA STATE NURSES’ ASSOCIATION           

A business meeting of the Private Duty Section, North Carolina State Nurses’ Association, was held at the O. Henry Hotel, Greensboro, March 19, 1943.  The chairman presided.

                Reports of district private duty sections and registries revealed that a great shortage of private duty nurses exists in every area of the state, and that many calls for private duty nurses are not filled.  The matter was discussed.

                It was decided that each district try to solve its problems by:

  1. Encouraging private duty nurses, doctors and the general public to prevent luxury nursing
  2. Promoting group nursing in hospitals
  3. Urging private duty nurses to make themselves available for calls at all times.

Aims

                Cooperation with hospitals in furnishing adequate civilian nursing service by private duty nurses doing general duty nursing part of each year during the war. 

                Stimulation of interest among inactive nurses to return to active duty for the duration.

                Education of co-workers and general public relative to the need for less luxury nursing and more group nursing.

                Cooperation with registrars in providing essential nursing for critically ill patients.

 

 

Achievements

                Midyear of meeting of Section

Respectfully submitted Mrs. Letha C. Cole, R.N Chairman 

REPORT OF PUBLIC HEALTH SECTION, NORTH CAROLINA STATE NURSES’ ASSOCIATION

                The Executive Committee of the Public Health Section, North Carolina State Nursing Association, met in Greensboro, March 20, 1943.  Members to serve on the following committees were appointed: Program, Nominations, Arrangements, Revision of Rules and Loan Fund. 

Aims

                Recruitment of nurses who have had some public health training to fill vacancies in county health departments.

                Stimulation of interest in public health nursing by having each district nurses’ association sponsor at least one program during the year pertaining to public health nursing.

Achievements

                Eleven nurses, qualified for public health nursing, who were in the state as wives of officers and enlisted men, have been recruited and are now serving in the various public health agencies.

                Some district nurses’ associations have conducted programs on public health nursing.

                Members of the various committees of the section have taken advantage of any group meetings, such as institutes, etc. to have committee meetings.

Respectfully submitted, 

McVeigh Hutchinson, R.N.

Chairman 

REPORT OF OFFICE AND INDUSTRIAL SECTION, NORTH CAROLINA STATE NURSES’ ASSOCIATION

                There has been no meeting of this Section since the 1942 Convention.

                Mrs. Ann E. Pate, Chairman of the Section, became ill and resigned.  The vice-chairman became chairman.

                Many industrial nurses attended the Nurses’ Section of the Safety Conference of the North Carolina Industrial Commission which was held in Charlotte, in May, 1943.  Mrs. Lousie East, R.N., Consultant, State Board of Health, Asheville, presided.  She represented the North Carolina State Nurses; Association at the conference.

                There is an active Office and Industrial Section in District Four (Greensboro) of the North Carolina State Nurses’ Association.  The T.V.A. industrial nurses have formed a club at Fontana Dam.  Dr. David Welton, Medical Director, U.S. Rubber Company (Munitions), Charlotte, has requested aid in organizing the nurses employed by his company into a club, which he hopes will include the Charlotte nurses who are engaged in industrial nursing.  Industrial nurses in and near Asheville are planning to organize a club.

                In spite of these plans, there have been suggestions that the Office and industrial Section of the North Carolina State Nurses’ Association recommend to the Board of Directors of the North Carolina State Nurses’ Association that the Section be dissolved, and that the nurses of this group join the Public Health Section.

                Some of the industrial nurses of the state have joined the American Association of Industrial Nurses.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Alma Kernon, R.N.

Chairman

 

REPORTS OF DISTRICT NURSES’ ASSOCIATIONS

 

DISTRICT NUMBER ONE

Asheville, N.C.

 

Number of Meetings – 12                                                            Memberships – 270

Average Attendance- 26                                                                               Alumnae Associations - 10

Number of Board of Directors Meetings – 2                         Nurses’ Clubs – 0

 

 

Programs

                The programs presented at the district meetings have been varied and interesting.  They included the followings demonstration and talk of specimens, “Intestinal Parasites,” by Dr. Sisk; demonstration of the Emerson respirator; presentation of works of modern poets and music; lecture, “Women’s Part in War Service,” by Mrs. Lucille McInturff; report of the Institute on Maternity and Infant care, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, by Mrs. Maude Morgan; a talk, “Experiences of an Army Nurses,” by 2nd Lt. Winifred Miller, Moore General Hospital; showing of the movie, “No Greater Glory”; a talk, “Trends of Nursing at Present,” by Mrs. Marie B. Noell.  Two business meetings were held.

 

Achievements

                Remembered 32 members with Christmas gifts.

                Established a booth for the recruitment of nurses for military service, located in the Buncombe  County Courthouse.

                Organized a unit of nurses for the Extemporized Military Hospitals.

                Organized a Private Duty Section.

                Supervised progress of district nursing council for war service.  Mrs. Edna Taylor Greene, R.N., is the new chairman.

 

Problems

                Poor attendance at monthly meetings.

                Present 12 hour duty program of private duty nurses.

 

These Problems Are Being Met By

                Providing interesting meetings and good programs.

                Organizing a district private duty section so that the private duty nurses can come to an understanding about their problems.

 

Financial Status

                Balance in treasury          $734.82

                On savings account           237.93

                Nurses’ Relief Bond            46.37

                War Bond                              100.00

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Mrs. Beatrice Crowell, R.N.

Chairman

 

DISTRICT NUMBER TWO

Winston-Salem, N.C.

 

Number of Meetings     10                           Membership – 339

Average Attendance      35                           Alumnae Associations – 5

                                                                                Nurses’ Clubs – 1

 

Programs

                October 1942, “The Challenge of Tomorrow,” Rev. Wilbur Hutchins, Pastor, Southside Baptist Church.

                November 1942, film, “The Problems of Tuberculosis.”

                December 1942, Christmas musical.

                January 1943, “Tropical Diseases,” Dr. Harold Brown, Dean, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

                February 1943, film, “No Greater Glory.” Talk, “Current Events in Nursing,” Mrs. Marie Noell, R.N., Raleigh, N.C.

                March 1943, “The Life of June A. Delano,” Blanche Stafford, R.N.

                April 1943, film, “City of Winston-Salem.”

                May 1943, “The Welfare of the Child During War,” Dr. Robert Lawson, Pediatrician, Bowman Gray School of Medicine.

                June 1943, “The History of the League of Nursing Education,” Sue Morgan, student, North Carolina Baptist Hospital, Winston-Salem.

                September 1943, Report of the Fiftieth Anniversary of the National League of Nursing Education and the Cadet Nurse Corps, Edna L. Heinzerling, R.N.

 

Achievements

                The purchase of two $100 War Bonds.

                The following donations:

                                $10 to the Journal – Sentinel milk fund.

                                $10 to the Winston-Salem Red Cross Chapter for the purchase of a desk.

                                Subscription of Life magazine for the U.S.O. center.

 

Problems

                Poor attendance at monthly meetings.

 

These Problems are Being Met By

                Notices of meetings are published in the morning and afternoon papers.

                Notices of meetings are posted in both hospitals in Winston-Salem.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Pauline Stuart, R.N.

President

 

DISTRICT NUMBER THREE

Charlotte, N.C.

 

Number of Meetings – 10                                            Membership – 515

Average Attendance – 40                                             Nurses’ Clubs – 1

                                                Alumnae Associations – 10

 

Programs

                Programs at district meetings included the following: Explanation of the proposed plans of a post-graduate administrative course for nurses with credit toward the B.A.  Degree at Queens College, by Ann H. Gardiner, Dean of Nursing Education, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing; talk, Bessie M. Chapman, Secretary, North Carolina Board of Nurse Examiners; lecture “Diabetes Mellitus,” Dr. Creighton Wreen, Lowrance Hospital, Mooresville; “Proposed Plans for Governmental Assistance with the Supply and Distribution of Nurses,” Flora Wakefield, President, and Mrs. Marie B. Noell, Executive Secretary, North Carolina State Nurses’ Association; Red Cross; “U.S. Cadet Nurse Corps,” Grace Lindsay, R.N.

                                The district members were entertained by the student nurses of the Mercy Hospital School of Nursing at the December meeting.

 

Achievements

                Purchased one $500 War Bond

                Donated $50 to the Red Cross

 

Problems

                Increasing the fee of private duty nurses.

                Shortage of nurses.

 

These Problems Are Being Met By

                An agreement of reasonable fees for private duty nurses was reached by the cooperation of the members of the Private Duty Section with allied groups.  The return of inactive nurses, the use of Red Cross Volunteer Nurse Aides, Red Cross canteen workers and civilian defense secretaries and workers have helped to alleviate the shortage of nurses.

 

Financial Status

                Balance on checking account ---- $1,015.40

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Ruby Dameron, R.N.

President

 

DISTRICT NUMBER FOUR

Greensboro, N.C.

 

Number of Meetings – 12                                            Membership – 295

Average Attendance – 25                                             Nurses’ Clubs - 2

                                                                                                Alumnae Associations – 1

 

Programs

                October 1942, “Civilian Defense,” Mr. Charles Yates, Director, Civilian Defense.

                November 1942, Business Meeting.

                December 1942, Christmas Party

                January 1943, Business Meeting

                February 1943, “Current Events of Nursing,” Mrs. Marie B. Noell, R.N.

                                                Film, “No Greater Glory”

                March 1943, Talk, Mr. Roy Morgan, Federal Bureau of Investigation.

                April 1943, Play, “Lift Thine Eyes,” presented by senior students, St. Leo’s Hospital, School of Nursing.

                May 1943, “Laboratory Procedures,” Dr. H.C. Lemmon

                June 1943, Business Session       

                July 1943, Business Session

                August 1943, Watermelon feast

                September 1943, “Army Nursing,” Lt. Elizabeth Johnson, Chief Nurse, B.T.C. #16, Greensboro, N.C.

                                Musical

 

Achievements

                Purchased two $100 War Bonds

                Donated $25 to Milk Fund

                Donated $10 to Student Nurses’ Scholarship Fund, Health Bureau

 

Financial Status

                Balance on checking account --- $267.00

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Mrs. E. Irby Long, R.N.

President

 

DISTRICT NUMBER FIVE

Durham, N.C.

 

Number of Meetings – 10                            Membership – 246

Average Attendance – 30                             Nurses’ Clubs – 0

                                                                                Alumnae Association – 2

 

Programs

                October 1942, Public Health Program, “Know For Sure”

                                                Movie and lecture, Dr. T.T. Perry

                November 1942, Reports of Delegates, North Carolina State Nurses’ Association, Annual Convention.

                December 1942, “Nurse Participation in War Work,” Mrs. Myra Parfitt, R.N.

                January 1943, “Blood Plasma,” Dr. Joseph Trent, Duke Hospital Staff

                February 1943, Review of article, American Journal of Nursing, “Maintaining the Quality of Nursing Service in the Emergency,” Kate Herndon, R.N.

                March 1943, “First Aid Nursing Care for Construction Workers,” Mrs. Eva Reese, R.N.

                April 1943, League Program – Speakers: Grace Linnell, R.N., Margaret Pinkerton, R.N., Lottie Corker, R.N., and Margaret   Binkley, R.N.

                May 1943, “Kenny Method of the Treatment of Poliomyelitis,” Dr. Harvey Vandegrift, Duke Hospital Staff

                June 1943, Joint meeting with District Number Six, Raleigh – “Tuberculosis Nursing,” Fannie Eschelman

                September 1943, “Extemporized Hospitals,” Maude Brown, R.N.

                Picnic supper.

 

Achievements

                Nurses’ Rally, Amphitheater, Duke Hospital, November 20, 1942, to stimulate interest in Army, Navy and civilian nursing.

                Secured increased in private duty fees, June 1, 1943.

                Entertained senior students of Duke University and Watts Hospital Schools of Nursing.

                Many members participated in War Bond Drive parade in Durham, July 23.  Nurses won third prize--$5 in War Stamps.

                Donated $50 to Red Cross

                Christmas gifts sent to ill members.

Outstanding Problems

                Shortage of nurses—private duty and staff nurses

 

These Problems are Being Met By

                Recruitment of student nurses

                Encouragement of retired nurses to become active

                Use of Red Cross volunteer nurse aids

 

Financial Status

                Balance on checking account -- $1000.00

                War Stamps ------------------------          5.00

                U.S. Treasury Bonds ------------       600.00

                Building & Loan Stock--------------1000.00

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Mrs. Louise M. Beard, R.N.

President

 

DISTRICT NUMBER SIX

Raleigh, N.C.

 

Number of Meetings – 10                                                            Membership - 248

Average Attendance – 30                                                             Nurses’ Clubs - 0

Number of Board of Directors Meetings – 3                         Alumnae Associations – 3

 

Programs

                Programs at district meetings have been varied and interesting, and included the following: paper, “The Kenny Treatment of Poliomyelitis”, lecture, “Pneumonia, Its Care and Treatment” and demonstration of the oxygen tent; lecture, “Veneral Disease Control,” and descriptive film; Red Cross; lecture, “Tuberculosis”; slides of Thoracoplasty and demonstration pneumothorax; reading and dramatization of the “Life of Nightingale,” (Program honored members of graduating classes of Rex, Mary Elizabeth and Dorothea Dix Schools of Nursing); lecture, “Tuberculosis Nursing,” by Fannie Eschelman, Dean of Nursing, Phipps Institute, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; talks, “Income Tax” and “Extemporize Military Hospitals,” A Christmas party was held in December jointly with members of the Wake County Medical Society and the Wake County Medical Society Auxiliary.

 

Achievements

                Organized a unit of nurses for the Extemporized Military Hospitals

                Sponsored a refresher course for inactive nurses at Rex Hospital

                Participated in sale of War Bonds and Stamps

                Participated in program of student nurse recruitment

                Cooperated in teaching Red Cross Home Nursing and Volunteer Nurse Aides

                Donated $25 to Red Cross

                Purchased $100 War Bond

 

 

Financial Status

                Balance in Bank --- $300.00

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Mrs. Bernice Baker Teachey, R.N.

President

 

DISTRICT NUMBER SEVEN

Fayetteville, N.C.

 

Number of Meetings – 5                              Membership - 194

Average Attendance – 24                             Alumnae Associations – 5

                                                                                Nurses’ Clubs – 0

 

Programs

January 1943, Highsmith Hospital, Fayetteville – Annual Business Meeting

March 1943, Baker Sanatorium, Lumberton – “First Aid Work in Robeson County”

May 1943, Hamlet Hospital, Hamlet – “The Need for Buying War Bonds”

July 1943, N.C. Sanatorium, Sanatorium – “Distribution of Nurses Under the Procurement and Assignment Service, Bureau of Placement, War Manpower Commission,” Mrs. Marie B. Noell, R.N.

                “U.S. Cadet Nurse Corps,” Bessie M. Chapman, R.N.

September 1943, Moore County Hospital, Pinehurst – “Army Nursing,” Capt. Kettrick,

                ANC, Camp McKall, N.C.

                Recruitment of Inactive Nurses,” Mrs. Spidona

                “Recruitment of Red Cross Volunteer Nurse Aides,” Mrs. Kemp

 

Achievements

                Revision of Constitution and By-Laws

                Cooperation in teaching Red Cross Home Nursing, First Aid and Volunteer Nurse Aides

                Participation in program of Student Nurse Recruitment

                Contribution of $20 to Mary Lewis Wyche Loan Fund

                Contribution of $5 to Elizabeth Hampton Robb Fund (National)

 

Problems

                Poor attendance at district meetings

 

Those Problems are Being Met By

                Holding meetings in different sections of the district

 

Financial Status

                Balance on hand -- $200.44

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Eula Rackley, R.N.

President

 

DISTRICT NUMBER EIGHT

Wilson, N.C.

 

Number of Meetings – 9                              Membership - 310

Average Attendance – 16                             Alumnae Associations – 5

                                                                                Nurses’ Clubs – 3

 

Programs

                October 1942, “Civilian Defense,” Mr. F.M. Sherrod

                November 1942, “Nurses in War Emergency,” Dr. B.C. Willis

                January 1943, a lecture, Dr. Fiske

                February 1943, “Bronchoscopy, Dr. M.E. Bizzell

                March 1943, “Seeing the World Through the Eyes of a Nurse,” E.C. Holland, President, E.C.T.C.

                April 1943, “Tuberculosis Nursing,” and explanations of chest x-rays, Dr. Eason

                May 1943, “Nursing Education During War,” Bessie M. Chapman, R.N.

                June 1943, “War Nursing in China,” Miss Hu Ching Wein, Shanghai, China

 

Achievements

                Participation in the program of recruitment of student nurses.

                Donated $50 to Red Cross

                Donated $50 to Mary Lewis Wyche Loan Fund

 

Problems

                Shortage of staff nurses

 

These Problems are Being Met By

                The use of Red Cross Volunteer Nurse Aides and practical auxiliaries

 

Financial Status

                Balance on Hand, September 30, 1943 ----  $500.65

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Mrs. J.C. Crone, R.N.

President

 

DISTRICT NUMBER NINE

Wilmington, N.C.

 

Number of Meetings – 10                                                            Membership - 235

Number of Board of Directors Meetings – 2                         Alumnae Associations - 1

Average Attendance – 21                                                             Nurses Clubs – 1

 

Programs

                Programs at district meetings have included the following: “Current Events in Nursing,” Flora Wakefield and Marie B. Noell; Movies, “No Greater Glory” and “Proof of the Pudding”; demonstration of advanced Red Cross First Aid; “Extemporized Military Hospitals,” Maude Brown; “Army Nursing,” Lt. Ruby Cheek, Army Nurse Corps.

Achievements

                Participation in program of student nurse recruitment

                Organization of one unit for Extemporized Military Hospitals

 

Outstanding Problems

                Shortage of nurses—staff and private duty

                Poor attendance at meetings

                Lack of cooperation from migrant nurses in furnishing nursing services to the community

 

These Problems Are Being Met By

                Rally of nurses and doctors was held for the purpose of discussing problems of the nursing situation of the community.

 

Gifts

                Christmas checks were sent to five ill members.

                Dues were paid for three members.

 

The district has purchased one $100 War Bond.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Mrs. Bessie Powell Neeley, R.N.

President

 

REPORTS OF NURSES’ CLUBS

 

District Number One – No Clubs

 

District Number Two- One Club

                Lexington Nurses’ Club

 

District Number Three – One Club

                Cabarrus County Nurses’ Club

 

District Number Four- Two Clubs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

High Point Graduate Nurses’ Club

 

The High Point Graduate Nurses’ Club has held regular monthly meetings.  Some were dinner and some were picnic supper meetings.  The programs have included lectures, musicals and a memorial service.

                A drive to collect money to purchase home defense supplies was successful.  Three hundred dollars were collected.

                Members of the club have worked one night each week on Red Cross dressings.

                Two $100 War Bonds have been purchased.

                Club members contributed to the Red Cross, Y.W.C.A., Christmas Stocking Fund, and furnished supplies for the station hospital at B.T.C. #10, Greensboro.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Wilma Webb, R.N.

President

 

Alamance Nurses’ Club

 

                The Alamance Nurses’ Club with a membership of 53 has had nine monthly meetings and an average attendance of 18.  The programs have included lectures by Mrs. Jessie Mitchell, R.N., N.Y.A. Supervisor; Mr. Jere Bason, Alamance County Farm Agent; movies of the Canadian Rockies shown by Dr. B.B. McDade.

                Two members, Mrs. George Carrington and Mrs. C.J. Hickey, have taught Red Cross Nurse Aide courses.  Six members have taught Red Cross Home Nursing Courses.

                Twenty dollars was donated to the Red Cross and $15 was given the Community Chest. 

                The bank balance as of October 1, 1943 is----- $153.92.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Ialeen Andrews, R.N.

President

 

District Number Five—No Clubs

 

District Number Six – No Clubs

 

District Number Seven – No Clubs

 

District Number Eight – Three Clubs

 

Goldsboro Nurses’ Club

 

                The Goldsboro Nurses’ Club, with a membership of 27, has had ten monthly meetings with an average attendance of ten.  The Club entertained the members of District Eight, North Carolina State Nurses’ Association at the February District Meeting.

                Fees for private duty nursing in Goldsboro were changed from $5 per day for all cases, to $5.75 for general nursing and $6 for contagious, alcoholic and obstetrical nursing.

                The following donations have been made: American Red Cross- $2; American Legion Auxiliary for Red Cross Kit - $3.  Sick members were remembered with flowers and gifts.

                Many members have been working in the Red Cross sewing rooms and serving on Civilian Defense Squads.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Mary Ann Dees, R.N.

Secretary

 

Kinston Nurses’ Club

 

                The Kinston Nurses’ Club has a membership of twenty-four.

                One thousand hours’ work has been given to Red Cross knitting and members served supper to 200 service men at local USO Club.

                Cash balance as follows:

                                Balance in bank, October 1, 1943 --- $26.67

                                Lila Bell Relief Fund ---------------------$20.35

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Maude Taylor, R.N.

President

 

Registered Nurses’ Club of Washington

 

                During the past year, the Registered Nurses’ Clubs of Washington had as its officers: Miss Nina Neal, re-elected President; Mrs. Ruby Elks, Vice-President; Miss Ethel Berry, Secretary; and Miss Mary Lee Sykes, Treasurer.

                Seven now members were admitted to the club and there were three resignations because of residential changes.

                In June members of District Eight were guests of the Club at the Knotty Pine Inn, at which time a delightful talk on the hospital organization and conditions in China was given by Miss Hu Ching, a Chinese graduate of the State Teacher’s College at Tallahassee, Florida.

                During the year, Mrs. D.E. Ford, Chairman of the Red Cross Nursing Service of the District, presented three of the senior class, Memorial General Hospital, with Senior Student Reserve Pins, who, after they pass their State Board Examinations, will be inducted into the Navy Nurse Corps.

                At the September meeting it was unanimously agreed to change the prices of private duty nursing for alcoholic, contagious diseases and obstetric cases to $6 per day instead of $5.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Nina Neal, R.N.

President

 

District Number Nine – One Club

                New Bern Nurses’ Club

REPORTS OF ALUMNAE ASSOCIATIONS

District Number One

 

Appalachian Hall Alumnae Association

 

Aston Park Alumnae Association

 

                The Aston Park Hospital Alumnae Association held three regular meetings and two meetings during the year.

                Flowers were sent to the sick members, members of the nursing staff of the hospital and doctors of the staff who were ill during the year.

                Three members who live out of the state joined the Association as inactive nurses.  There was also a slight increase in members joining the alumnae association and the district through the alumnae. 

Our alumnae members are not eligible for military service but we are proud to report that one of our members is in the Navy Nurse Corps and two in the Army Nurse Corps after having taken post-graduate nurses.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Elaine Melbourne, R.N.

President

 

Biltmore Alumnae Association

 

                The Biltmore Alumnae Association, with a membership of 38, has had 9 meetings.

                A subscription of the American Journal of Nursing was given to the student nurses of Biltmore Hospital School of Nursing.

                The graduating class was entertained at a picnic.

                In honor of Miss Mary Laxton, an award of $15 was made to the honor student of the graduating class of the Biltmore School of Nursing.

                Members of the alumnae approved the change of the school cap.

 

                Respectfully submitted,

 

Beatrice Armstrong, R.N.

President

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grace Hospital Alumnae Association – Banner Elk

 

                The Grace Hospital Alumnae Association, with a membership of 20, has had monthly meetings.  The annual meeting was held in connection with the graduation festivities.

                Members of the association donated $9 for nursery equipment and $10 for nursing literature for the hospital library.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Essie Ball, R.N.

President

 

Grace Hospital Alumnae Association – Morganton

 

                The Grace Hospital Alumnae Association with a membership of 28 has held 9 meetings.

                A $50 War Bond was purchased; $25 was donated to the Red Cross; a subscription to the American Journal of Nursing was given to the nursing school library.

                Flowers were sent to students, alumnae members, doctors and their wives who were ill.  Frequent parties were provided for student nurses.

                The outstanding student in the graduating class was given a Florence Nightingale lamp and a hypodermic set.

                The shortage of nurses and poor attendance of monthly meetings have been problems. These problems are being met by providing better programs and in individual invitations to meetings.

                Several inactive nurses have been located and urged to return to the profession for the duration.

                Balance in bank -- $429.51

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Helen Pientka, R.N.

                President

 

Highland Hospital Alumnae Association

 

                The Highland Hospital Alumnae Association has held quarterly meetings, which included an interesting program and a social hour.

                Contributions were made to the Red Cross and toward the equipment of a  hospital for negroes.  Sick and bereaved members have been remembered.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Lola Fay, R.N.

President

 

Meriwether Hospital Alumnae Association

 

Mission Hospital Alumnae Association

Mountain Sanitarium and Hospital Alumnae Association

 

               

                The Alumnae Association of the Mountain Sanitarium and Hospital had its annual meeting August 29 at the time of the graduation weekend for the purpose of welcoming the graduating class as members of the association, for the election of officers, and for the transaction of business.

                The following business was transacted: The Constitution was amended as follows regard to membership: “The payment of dues for three years gives life membership.  This is to be retroactive.”

                It was voted to secure a Service Flag for nurses in military service, which is to be hung in the library in the nurses’ home.  We have one alumnae member in active duty at the Naval Hospital, Key West, Florida.

                It was voted to cooperate with the School of Nursing in building up a Student Loan Fund.  This fund is to be made up of contribution of alumnae, faculty members, and other interested persons.  It is to be under the control of a committee composed of the director of the school of nursing, the supervisor of the nurses’ residence and a third member to be chose by these two.  Student nurses are to have the privilege of obtaining loans without interest from this fund for personal use.  The loan is to be repaid after graduation.

                Because of the scattered membership it is not possible for us to have monthly meetings.  Our members are very much interested in the work of the alumnae and attend, as much as possible, the annual meetings.  There are 52 members at present.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Worthie Lewis, R.N.

Secretary-Treasurer

 

Rutherford Hospital Alumnae Association

 

District Number Two

 

City Memorial Hospital Alumnae Association

 

The City Memorial Hospital Alumnae Association, with a membership of 195, has held 10 monthly meetings with an average attendance of 14.

 

Programs

  1. A talk by Mrs. Lillian Chambers, who was residing in Pearl Harbor at the time of the Japanese attack.
  2. Candle lighting service in honor of the graduates of the City Memorial Hospital who are in the Army or Navy Nurse Corps.
  3. Original poems read by Miss Mildred Knight.
  4. Motion picture on the preparation and use of synthetic rubber by a special representative of the Esso Marketers.
  5. Motion Picture, “Strange God’s of India,” sponsored by Standard Oil Company.
  6. Programs of violin and piano selections by Mrs. Leonard Nanzetta and Miss Virginia Lawrence.
  7. Films, “The City of Winston-Salem and “Middletown Goes to War,” a film on tuberculosis.
  8. Program of piano selections by Miss Miriam Swaim.
  9. Musical program by three students of the City Memorial Hospital School of Nursing.
  10. Film, “No Greater Glory,” on Army and Navy Nursing and a film on syphilis which was given by a representative of the City Health Department.

 

Achievements

                In November the alumnae association purchase a plaque with the names of the thirty-three nurses who are in the service of our country.  This plaque is exhibited in the front lobby of the hospital.

                Six books were donated to the students’ library through a subscription to the Book of the Month Club.  Four volumes of History of Nursing Books were also donated to the Reference Library for the student nurses.

                Ten dollars was donated to the Salvation Army for a needy family at Christmas.  A contribution of ten dollars was made to the Journal and Sentinel Milk and Ice Fund for under privilege children.

                Open House was held at the Nurses’ Home, May 30 for girls who were interested in becoming student nurses.  Members of both alumnae and student nurses were present to entertain  them.  A group of student nurses gave a musical program.  An informal social hour was enjoyed by all. Refreshments were served by the members of the preclinical class of the nursing school.  A tour of the nurses’ home, class room, library and hospital was made with members of the student body acting as guides.  We had approximately thirty girls to call.

                Twenty members of the graduating class were presented two dollars each in defense stamps instead of having a dance in honor of the class.

 

Problems

                Our greatest problem is attendance.  There are 75 members of the alumnae living in the city, and we only have an average attendance of fourteen.  The secretary sends a written notice to each member of the time, place and program for the meeting.  A notice is also published in both morning and afternoon editions of the city paper.  Notices concerning the meeting are also posted in the staff house and hospital.  The meetings are held at alternate times.  One month the meeting is held at night and the next month in the afternoon.  As yet no improvements have been made in attendance.

                The serving of refreshments was also a problem which we encountered due to the transportation facilities and also food rationing.  Due to these factors it was decided to discontinue  serving of refreshments for the duration.  This money was saved and we are planning to purchase another $100 War Bond at the next meeting.

                We have invited the student nurses to attend four meetings and special programs.  Our aim in doing this is to instill a desire in the students to become interested in the alumnae association and want to become a member as soon as they are eligible.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Sylvia Kiger, R.N.

Secretary

 

 

 

Martin Memorial Hospital Alumnae Association

 

                The Martin Memorial Hospital Alumnae Association, with a membership of 75, has held 10 monthly meetings with an average attendance of 12.  The meetings consisted of business sessions, interesting programs and social hours.  Meetings are held at the nurses’ home or in the homes of the members of the association.  No refreshments will be served during the war.

                Dues and donations from members have been used for: donations to Community Chest, $14; Buddy Kits, $14; purchase of War Bonds and Stamps.

                An out-door fireplace was given to the nurses’ home at a cost of $60.

                Forty dollars was realized from the sale of victory aprons, made and sold by members of the association.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Eliza B. Fogleman, R.N.

Secretary

 

North Carolina Baptist Hospital Alumnae Association

 

                The North Carolina Baptist Hospital Alumnae Association, with a membership of 60 has held 9 monthly meetings with an average attendance of 10.

                Achievements of the association include: sending a news letter to members of the association who are in military service; donating to Red Cross; buying War Bonds.

                Problems include: low membership and poor attendance at meetings.  Cards containing information about the association have been sent to each member, in an effort to overcome the lack of interest.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Mrs. Lucille C. Hartman, R.N.

Secretary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salisbury Alumnae Association

 

                The Salisbury Alumnae Association, with a membership of 34, has held 10 meetings with an average attendance of 12.

                Programs have included: business meetings; reports of state meetings; lectures – Public Health Nursing, Louise McDaniels; Red Cross Nursing Service, Elizabeth King; demonstration of the Kenny Method of Nursing Poliomyelitis, Louise McDaniels; a Christmas party.

                The association cooperated in offering Red Cross Nurse Aide courses.  Members have aided the Red Cross by knitting.

                Members of the association have cooperated with the local hospital in providing nursing service by each member who is a private duty nurse doing at least five days general duty of each month.

                A donation of $50 was made to the Red Cross.

                No refreshments will be served at meetings for the duration.  Money formally used for this purpose will be used to purchase War Bonds.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Mrs. Norma C. McCanless, R.N.

 

District Number Three

 

Anson Sanatorium Alumnae Association

 

                The Anson Sanatorium Alumnae Association, with a membership of 15, held one meeting.  Nine members attended.  Officers for the coming year were elected.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Edna Huff, R.N.

President

 

Charlotte Sanatorium Alumnae Association

 

                The Charlotte Sanatorium Alumnae Association, with  a membership of 70, has held 9 meetings with an average attendance of 20.

                Programs have consisted of business sessions and social hours.

                Balance in bank - $38.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Mrs. Stella C. Gay, R.N.

President

 

Davis Hospital Alumnae Association

 

                The Davis Hospital Alumnae Association, with a membership of 80, has held five meetings, with an average attendance of 15.

                Programs have included business sessions, reports of state meetings, annual picnic and lectures.  Topics of speeches were: “Blood Plasma,” “Gas Welfare,”  “Penicillin,” “Army Nursing”

                Achievements are as follows: Student Nurse Loan Fund ($150) was established; financial assistance for graduation exercises; history of association (1930 to 1943) written by Mrs. Dayvault, made into booklet form and left in classroom; increased membership; four members enrolled in Red Cross Nursing Service (20 members are in military service); presented outstanding senior student with hypodermic syringe.

                Problems include poor attendance at meetings and shortage of nurses.

                Problems are being met by holding meetings at places convenient to members; encouraging retired nurses to become active for the duration; private duty nurses returning to duty after an eight hour rest or doing twelve hour duty when necessary.

                Nineteen dollars and sixty cents was realized from the association sponsoring the demonstration and sales of Stanley products.  Balance in checking account is $162.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Mrs. Golda Dayvault, R.N.

President

 

Gordon-Crowell Alumnae Association

 

H.F. Long Alumnae Association

 

                The H.F. Long Alumnae Association, with a membership of 33 has had 6 meetings, with an average attendance of 15.

                Programs have included “Sulfa Drugs,” Dr. McDevitt; “African Experience,” Dr. Deaton; “Urgent Need for Red Cross Nurses”; “Medical Diseases”

                Achievements include; purchase of one $100 War Bond; donation of curtains for nurses’ home; entertained senior students at annual party.

                Problems consist of the shortage of nurses.  The problems are being met by the cooperation of physicians, hospital superintendents and alumnae members.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Mrs. W.L. Beard, R.N.

President

 

Lowrance Hospital Alumnae Association

 

                The Lowrance Hospital Alumnae Association, with a membership of 30, has had 10 monthly meetings.  The average attendance was ten members.

                Programs included: “History of the American Journal of Nursing for Forty-Two Years,” Mrs. Harold Powers; “Diabetes Mellitus,” Dr. Creighton Wrenn; “Nursing History on Parade;” demonstration of Kenny Method of treatment of Poliomyelitis; reports of state meetings; movies, “Why We Should Invest 10% of our Income in War Bonds” and “A Letter From Bataan.”

                Three alumnae associations—H.F. Long, Davis and Lowrance—joined in entertaining members of District Three, North Carolina State Nurses’ Association, for the November meeting.

                Poor attendance at monthly meetings is the outstanding problem.  Members have been urged to share their cars for the purpose of bringing more members to all meetings.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Mrs. Buford Compton, R.N.

President

 

Mercy Hospital Alumnae Association

 

                The Mercy Hospital Alumnae Association has a membership of 91.  Nine meetings have been held, with an average attendance of 13.

                The association had the American Journal of Nursing bound for the Mercy Hospital Nursing School library.

                Gifts were sent to three members who are serving with the armed forces overseas.  Forty members are in the armed forces.

                The association entertained the members of District Number Three, North Carolina State Nurses’ Association, at a district meeting.  Student nurses of Mercy Hospital School of Nursing provided a musical program.

                Poor attendance at monthly meetings is the outstanding problem.  Plans to provide more interesting programs have been made.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Mrs. Edith W. Norris, R.N.

Secretary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

District Number Four

 

St. Leo’s Hospital Alumnae Association

 

                The St. Leo’s Hospital Alumnae Association has a membership of 106.

                Programs presented at meetings were: “Democracy and Religion,” Mr. Bryce Holt, Greensboro; a play, “The Case of the Strange Baby,” students; St. Leo’s Hospital School of Nursing; film, “The Passion Play,” “Blood Plasma,” Lt. Stevens, Basic Training Center #16, Greensboro.

                The association sponsored a Red Cross First Aid course; secured pictures for publication in the Greensboro Daily News of members of the association in military service; raised money to purchase a service flag by selling stationary.

                Gifts include a movie machine for the classroom of St. Leo’s school of nursing at the cost of $105; $50 was given toward expenses of a victory garden to benefit St. Leo’s Hospital; $5 was given to Red Cross; $5 given to Milk Fund; $5 was given to Christmas Empty Stocking Fund.

                Poor attendance at meetings is the main problem.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Joncie S. Shidal, R.N.

President

 

District Number Five

 

Duke Hospital Alumnae Association

 

                The Duke Hospital Alumnae Association has a membership of 149.  Regular meetings have been held with an average attendance of 20.

                The constitution and by-laws of the association were revised to conform with the American Nurses’ Association.

                Fifty dollars was given to the Library Fund of Duke University School of Nursing.  The same account will be given annually to some worthy cause for the nursing school.

                The hospital, through the alumnae association, presented each graduate of the nursing school with a pen.  This will be done each year as long as the association presents the gift of $50 to a nursing school project.

                The monetary value of a Florence Nightingale Plaque was given to the best all-around student in War Stamps.

                The picture of the members of the 65th General Hospital Unit was framed and hung in the nurses’ home.

                Members participated in the War Bond drives.

                The Committee on Publication has sent alumnae notes to all members.

                Balance in the general fund is $273.50.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Ruth A. Wilson, R.N.

President

 

Watts Hospital Alumnae Association

 

                The Watts Hospital Alumnae Association with a membership of 149, has held 8 monthly meetings, with an average attendance of 9.

                Programs have consisted of interesting lectures, discussions and an entertainment for students.

                The 1943 graduating class was honored by the association at a banquet and dance held in April.

                A Loan Fund for student nurses was established in 1942.

                The Association contributed to Red Cross.

                The shortage of nurses is an outstanding problem.  The association sponsored refresher courses in an effort to help the situation.

                Balance in treasury is $300.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Mrs. Laura Preddy Brock, R.N.

President

 

District Number Six

 

Rex Hospital Alumnae Association

 

                The Rex Hospital Alumnae Association with a membership of 121, has held 9 meetings, with an average attendance of 21.  Two executive meetings were held.

                Thirty-five members are serving with the armed forces---four in foreign service.

                Interesting programs have stimulated attendance.

                Each member of the 1943 graduating class was presented the Rex Coat of Arms.              

                The association sponsored the sale of War Bonds and stamps in a local department store one week in April.  Total sales amounted to $3,034.50.

                Donations were as follows: $5 for a needy family; $5 for Mary Lewis Wyche Loan Fund; $163.32 for the equipment and supplies for classroom at Wake County Red Cross Chapter Headquarters’ for teaching Red Cross Home Nursing Courses.

                Several members have volunteered to serve with a unit of nurses for the Military Hospitals.  

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Mrs. Annie W. Johnston, R.N.

President

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mary Elizabeth Hospital Alumnae Association

 

                The Mary Elizabeth Hospital Alumnae Association with a membership of 33, has held 9 meetings with an average attendance of 10.

                An interesting program was presented at each meeting.

                Gifts include: one dollar in War Stamps to each student nurse at Christmas: flowers or an appropriate gift to members who were sick or bereaved; Red Cross.

                The association sponsored the sale of War Bonds and Stamps in a department store booth one week in May.  A total of $10,000 in Bonds and stamps was sold.

                The association purchased $100 War Bond.

                Thirty-Four dollars was realized from the sale of Christmas cards and luncheon sets.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Mrs. Bessie Hodges Mims, R.N.

President

 

Dorothea Dix Hospital Alumnae Association

 

                During the period from October 1942 to October 1943, we had ten meetings.  Flowers were sent to four ill members during the year.

                The alumnae entertained at a Christmas tea, and gave a picnic for the senior class.  A representative was sent to the mid-year meeting of the State Nurses’ Association.

                Fifteen dollars have been contributed to buy books for the library.

                The alumnae purchased a $25 War Bond in the Third War Bond Drive.

                A $25 scholarship was given to the member of the freshman class making the highest scholastic record.

                Five members have been added to the alumnae.

                We have a balance of $24.50 in the treasury at the present time.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Marguerite Johnson

President

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

District Number Seven

 

Baker Sanatorium Alumnae Association

 

                The Baker Sanatorium Alumnae Association with a membership of 83, has held 9 monthly meetings, with an average attendance of 12.

                Six members are subscribers to the American Journal of Nursing.

                Eleven members are serving with the armed forces.

                The association purchased one $25 War Bond.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Rachel M. Baker, R.N.

President

 

Highsmith Hospital Alumnae Association

 

                The Highsmith Hospital Alumnae Association with a membership of 42, has held 8 meetings with an average attendance of 14.

                Seventeen members are serving with the armed forces.

                Twenty-two members are subscribers to the American Journal of Nursing.

                The association sponsors the nurses’ registry.  There are 16 registrants.  A fee of $5 is charged graduates of other schools.

                An effort has been made to influence inactive nurses to nurse for the duration.  The response has been poor.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Myrtle McCall, R.N.

President

 

North Carolina Sanatorium Alumnae Association

 

                The North Carolina Sanatorium Alumnae Association has a membership of 62.  No meetings have been held.

                Five members have entered the armed forces this year.

                Fourteen members are subscribers to the American Journal of Nursing.

                A donation to the Mary Lewis Wyche Loan Fund was made.

                A donation towards books for the nurses’ library was made.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Elizabeth O’Brien, R.N.

President

 

 

 

 

Pittman Hospital Alumnae Association

 

Thompson Hospital Alumnae Association

 

                The Thompson Hospital Alumnae Association with a membership of 19, has had 4 meetings with an average attendance of 6.

                Eight members are serving with the armed forces.

                Six members are subscribers to the American Journal of Nursing.

                Two members are taking post-graduate courses.

                The associations sponsored Red Cross Nurse Aid and Home Nursing courses.  They also participated in the War Bond Drives.

                A contribution was made to the Red Cross.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Mrs. Marie McRae Ecklan, R.N.

President

 

District Number Eight

 

Carolina General Hospital Alumnae Association

 

                The Carolina General Hospital Alumnae Association has a membership of 39.  Regular monthly meetings have been held.

                Programs have consisted of entertaining the graduating class in June at a swimming party and picnic supper, two joint meetings with Woodard-Herring Alumnae Association, talks by Miss Jennie McMasters and 1st Lt. Ruby Cheek on Red Cross Enrollment and Army Nursing.

                Six members are in military service.  One is in foreign service stationed in India.

                The main activities of the association have been: the recruitment of nurses for Red Cross, participation in War Bond drives and contributions to disabled members and worthy needy individuals.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Mrs. Walter Roberson, R.N.

President

 

Park View Hospital Alumnae Association

 

                The Park View Hospital Alumnae Association donated $25 to the Red Cross and $25 to the USO.

                Each member of the graduating class was presented a gift.

                Members have participated in the War Bond drives.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Mrs. Dorothy Thompson, R.N.

President

Roanoke Rapids Hospital Alumnae Association

 

                The Roanoke Rapids Hospital Alumnae Association has sponsored three courses for Red Cross nurse aides.  There were 53 students, forty of whom are active.