New Deal tables and references

TABLE 1. North Carolina Emergency Relief Administration Statistics: Summary of Public Health and Nursing Work Under the Federal Relief Administration in North Carolina (1934-1935)

 

Activity

             Number

Registered nurses employed

                       216

Public health nurses employed                          

                         79

Nurses aids employed                                                                    

                       222

People visited in their home by nurses or aides              

                  63,768

Home visits                                                                                                  

                  23,450

Children examined

                  39,608

Defects corrected

                    1,290

Routine medical examinations

Wasserman tests given                                                                                                                          

Blood tests given

Special tests and procedures

Dental examinations

Dental corrections

Immunizations given

Clinics operated

Group meetings for health education

Health surveys

                    6,830

                    3,824

                       988

                    3,696

                  12,391

                  10,652

                  19,934

                       406

                    1,873

                       619

 

TABLE 2. Cumulative Report of the 65 CWA Nurses Assigned to the Department of Child Health, State Board of Health (February 5, 1934—May 12, 1934)

 

 

Schools visited

Children examined

Defects found

Malnourished children:

     10% or more underweight

     Appearance or report of teacher

Home visits:

     Investigation of malnutrition

     Securing corrections

     Educational bedside work

Prenatal conferences:

     Individual

     Group

Home visits:

     Prenatal

     Postnatal

     Visits to nursery schools

Treatments secured by:

     Dentists

     Physicians

Immunizations secured:

     Diptheria

     Smallpox

     Typhoid fever

 

3,086

115,771

55,801

 

21,374

2,323

 

4,222

5,175

3,185

 

2,529

269

 

2,776

2,260

781

 

280

1,198

 

4,251

12,787

5,927

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

REFERENCES

 

Ashmun, M. (1933). Cause and cure of unemployment. The

American Journal of Nursing, 33 (7), July 1933, 653.

 

 

Badger, A. J. (1981). North Carolina and The New Deal. N.C.

Division of Archives and History, Raleigh, NC.

 

Buhler-Wilkinson, K. (1993), Guarded by standards and directed by strangers. Nursing History Review, I, 139-54.

 

Cooper, G. (1934). A state program of school health in North

Carolina. Journal of Public Health Nursing, 9.

 

Council,  R. (1935). State ERA activities.  Public Health Nurse,

50 (5), 338.

 

CWA labor constructs. (1934, August). 39,256 privies in North Carolina 49 (8).

 

Davidson,  J. W. , & Lytle, M. H. (1988). The United States, a history of the republic.  Englewood Cliffs: Prentice Hall.

 

Kirk, J. S., Cutler, W. A., & Morse, T. W. (Eds.). (1936). Emergency   relief  in   North   Carolina.   Raleigh:   Edwards   and Broughton.

 

FERA Rules & Regulations  (1933). Washington, D.C.

 

Fisher, A.L. (1936). Nurse of the Monfu. Public Health Nurse, 28 (.12),

 

Fitzpatrick,  M. L. (1975). The National Organization of Public Health Nursing 1912-1952. New York: NLN.

 

Fox, R. E. (1942). Progress made in local health work since the availability of social security funds. The Health Bulletin, 57 (2),

 

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Kalisch, P.A., & Kalisch, B. J. (1995). The advance of American

nursing. Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott Company.

 

Leuchtenburg,  W. E. (1963).  Franklin Roosevelt  and the New

Deal, 1932-1940. New York: Harper and Row.

 

McKay, E. M. (1935). Catawba County Preventorium for Undernourished and Underpriviledged  Children. The Health Bulletin, 50 (11),

 

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Act: Developments under the United  States  Public  Health Service. Public Health Nurse, 28(9), 585-590.

 

Melosh, B. (1982). The physician's hand: Work culture and conflict in American nursing. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

 

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                                                                                         '.

 

 

 

Parrott, J. M. (1932). Annual Address to the North Carolina State Board of Health 1932. Biannual Report of the NC State Board of Health to the General Assembly of NC, 1932-1933.

 

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Pollitt, P. A. (1991). Lydia Holman: Community health pioneer. Nursing Outlook, 39 (5),

 

Pollitt, P. (1994). Goldie Allen: Itinerant Red Cross Nurse American History of Nursing Bulletin, 43.

 

Reeves, N. R. (September 1934). "County Nurse," The Skyland Post, Jefferson, N.C.

 

Sargent, E. G. (1933). The nursing profession works for recovery. The American Journal  of Nursing 33, 1165-1172.

 

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The Special  Child Welfare Project  report. (1934). The  Health

Bulletin, 49 (8), 6-8.

 

Woodard, E. S. (1937). Nursing and public health projects under WPA. Public Health Nurse, 29 (3), 169-72.   ·;

 

Wyche, M. L. (1937). A history of nursing in North Carolina.

Chapel Hill:  University of North Carolina Press.